“Downtown” Ephesus

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The ancient city of Ephesus contains one of the largest collections of ancient ruins. Even though only about 15% of the site has been excavated, tourists are able to see the grandeur of this ancient city. Ephesus was a major Roman city second in size (and importance) only to Rome. At its height in the second century, about 300,000 people lived there.

City street

City street

The Library of Celsus is probably the most well-known structure in Ephesus. It was built around 100 AD and then destroyed during an earthquake around 270 AD. The library was not rebuilt after the earthquake, but the front façade was re-erected in 1970. Celsus was the 3rd largest ancient library (after Alexandria and Pergamon) and once held about 12,000 scrolls.

Library of Celsus

Library of Celsus

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The Odeon was a small roofed theater built around 150 AD with seating for about 1,500 people.

Odeon

Odeon

Ephesus’s outdoor theater is believed to be the largest in the ancient world. This three-tiered theater is built into the slope of a hill and offers seating for 25,000 people!

Outdoor Theater

Outdoor Theater

Temple of Hadrian

Temple of Hadrian

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Hadrian's Gate

Hadrian’s Gate

The Temple of Domitian was one of the largest temples in the city.

Temple of Domitian

Temple of Domitian

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Nike

Nike

And just in case you ever wondered what an ancient public latrine looked like…

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Categories: Destinations, Turkey | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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3 thoughts on ““Downtown” Ephesus

  1. Pingback: The ‘Burbs of Ephesus | Where In The World Is Dayna...

  2. WOW! Those latrines!! I guess they sat next to their neighbor and chatted while they handled their business? And I am assuming these must have been used mainly by men since everything about women was supposed to be (and I guess is still) private. Oh and why did I think that facade had been erected in the A.D. era? That was very interesting to learn. Thanks!

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